Episode 11: Kerstin Cable – Fluent Language - Lingua Materna
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Episode 11: Kerstin Cable – Fluent Language

My guest for episode 11 of the Lingua Materna Podcast is Kerstin Cable from Fluent Language.

Kerstin is a native German-speaker from the Moselle Valley although you might not guess it from her amazing native-like English accent!

She's studied English, French, Italian, Latin and Spanish and is currently trying her hand at Welsh.

lingua materna podcast ep11 kerstin cable

In this episode we talk about the role habits play in learning a language. We discuss setting vision goals to inspire you, taking control of your learning as an independent learner and how to add extra accountability to your language routine.

We also chat about the brand new Language Habit Toolkit which Kerstin has recently launched. ​This organisational resource is a result of Kerstin's years of experience as both a language learner and a language coach. If you struggle to maintain a consistent language learning routine, this is defintely something you'll want to check out!

Don't miss your chance to win a free Language Habit Toolkit! Between 17 May and 03 June, Kerstin will be giving away one Language Habit Toolkit a day to blog tour readers. All you need to do to enter is leave a comment below with your  thoughts about this episode of the podcast and what language habits you plan to create!

Fluent Language Kerstin Cable Blog Tour Tube Map

And don't forget to check out more from all the other great language experts participating in Kerstin's Blog Tour by visiting www.fluentlanguage.co.uk/blogtour.

Why not leave us a review on iTunes? 

If you enjoyed this episode, please consider leaving a review on iTunes! These reviews are great feedback and they help me bring the show to a wider audience.

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James Granahan
 

I'm a language acquisition expert and mindset-oriented learner. I love to learn new skills and push myself out of my comfort zone. I'm passionate about online business, travel and languages. Access the FREE e-course '5 Steps to Revolutionize the Way You Learn English for Business': http://goo.gl/IFTkWl

  • Kate Fisher

    Thanks for the podcast. I enjoyed the interview on this great topic. I especially liked the idea of envisioning myself speaking, listening, writing or reading in the language that I’m learning. Currently that is Polish. I’m imagining that I’m in Warsaw making small talk in a shop or with a waitress in a small café. I’m also carrying on a conversation with some of my Polish clients, perhaps discussing a video or movie that we’ve watched. I feel totally engaged and delighted.

    I also liked the idea of building an identity as a language learner. We assume so many roles in our lives. I’m at a point in my life where I can bring this part of my identity to the forefront again. : )

    You touched upon the issue of seeing progress. I’d love to have a discussion about ways to do this. I’ve used recordings of conversations at various intervals, placement tests such as Off2Class or at Cambridgeinstitute.net. What other ideas do you have?

    • Hi Kate,

      You’re welcome! I’m really glad you enjoyed it.

      I like the vision you’ve talked about of speaking with clients or in a cafe in Warsaw. It’s easy to get caught up in learning materials sometimes and forget the real reason you’re learning a language but I think you have a very clear vision of what you’re aiming for!

      Yes, the point Kerstin made about identity was great. When you adopt that identity and making learning a language a central part of your life, it becomes much easier to improve. I think it’s partly because you’ve created a routine of practising very regularly and also partly because when you adopt that identity you refuse to give up. It’s like failing to learn the language isn’t even a possibility anymore and this mindset helps you to keep going.

      Seeing or tracking your progress is an interesting idea and there are so many different ways you could look at doing it. The idea that mention of recording conversations or monologues at various intervals is a good idea and doing placement tests every now and again can help too.

      I general approach tracking my progress in two ways. The first is to track how often I’m practising and for how long. I know that no matter what, learning a new language is going to take time and effort. So, the first part of tracking my progress is tracking the time I spend with the language. If I’m making time for an hour with the language every day, I know I’ll improve.

      The second element of tracking progress for me is about ‘what’ you’re doing and achieving certain goals. It’s a good idea to set regular goals for yourself (both longer term goals and short weekly or monthly goals). By setting a goal for the month, I’m able to track my progress by whether I achieve that goal in the time frame I’ve set for myself.

      Finally, if you’re not seeing the progress you want, it’s important to analyse your learning style and see what you can change to improve. If you’re putting in the time, you’ll inevitably see improvements. So if you’re not seeing that improvement, it’s a case of tweaking ‘how you practice’in order to learn more efficiently or to focus on the aspects of the language that are causing you trouble.

    • Hi Kate,

      You’re welcome! I’m really glad you enjoyed it.

      I like the vision you’ve talked about of speaking with clients or in a cafe in Warsaw. It’s easy to get caught up in learning materials sometimes and forget the real reason you’re learning a language but I think you have a very clear vision of what you’re aiming for!

      Yes, the point Kerstin made about identity was great. When you adopt that identity and making learning a language a central part of your life, it becomes much easier to improve. I think it’s partly because you’ve created a routine of practising very regularly and also partly because when you adopt that identity you refuse to give up. It’s like failing to learn the language isn’t even a possibility anymore and this mindset helps you to keep going.

      Seeing or tracking your progress is an interesting idea and there are so many different ways you could look at doing it. The idea that mention of recording conversations or monologues at various intervals is a good idea and doing placement tests every now and again can help too.

      I general approach tracking my progress in two ways. The first is to track how often I’m practising and for how long. I know that no matter what, learning a new language is going to take time and effort. So, the first part of tracking my progress is tracking the time I spend with the language. If I’m making time for an hour with the language every day, I know I’ll improve.

      The second element of tracking progress for me is about ‘what’ you’re doing and achieving certain goals. It’s a good idea to set regular goals for yourself (both longer term goals and short weekly or monthly goals). By setting a goal for the month, I’m able to track my progress by whether I achieve that goal in the time frame I’ve set for myself.

      Finally, if you’re not seeing the progress you want, it’s important to analyse your learning style and see what you can change to improve. If you’re putting in the time, you’ll inevitably see improvements. So if you’re not seeing that improvement, it’s a case of tweaking ‘how you practice’in order to learn more efficiently or to focus on the aspects of the language that are causing you trouble.

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